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McPhersonSentinel - McPherson, KS
  • Old Mill Museum to host Americans by Choice exhibit

  • The McPherson County Old Mill Museum in Lindsborg will host a new traveling exhibition Americans By Choice: The Story of Immigration and Citizenship In Kansas’ from Sept. 16 through Nov. 2.
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  • The McPherson County Old Mill Museum in Lindsborg will host a new traveling exhibition Americans By Choice: The Story of Immigration and Citizenship In Kansas’ from Sept. 16 through Nov. 2.
     A special opening event will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Sept. 16.
    The exhibit, which features personal stories of people who settled in Kansas and became U.S. citizens, was developed to help celebrate the 150th anniversary of Kansas.   
    Most Kansans can trace their heritage to another part of the world.  
    Some came in search of a better life for themselves or their children. Many came to join families or friends.
    Between 1865 and 1880, Kansas attracted immigrants at a faster pace than anywhere else in the U.S.
    The Americans By Choice exhibition includes 75 personal stories illustrating the paths to citizenship taken by settlers from around the world.
    Visitors can tour the exhibit’s 10 large multi-dimensional graphic panels and explore photographs, documents, video and other interactive components to better understand the struggles, sacrifices and accomplishments of Kansans who took this journey.   
    In addition to the exhibit, The Café Set, featuring Lynn Young and Mike Martin, will perform music representative of the varied ethnic groups that settled in Kansas in the era from 1865 to 1880.
    The duo will perform on the accordion, violin, mandolin and concertina. Refreshments will be served.
    For more information about Americans By Choice: The Story of Immigration and Citizenship in Kansas or museum events, call 785-227-3595 or email oldmillmuseum@hotmail.com.  
    This exhibit was privately funded by the District of Kansas Bench-Bar Committee in honor of the 150th anniversary of Kansas.
    It can be seen on permanent display at the Robert J. Dole Courthouse in Kansas City, Kan.
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