Thanksgiving dinner is going to cost a little more this year. According to figures from the American Farm Bureau Federation, a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, including turkey, stuffing, cranberries, pumpkin pie and all the basic trimmings will cost about 1.3 percent more this year when compared to 2009 food costs.


Thanksgiving dinner is going to cost a little more this year. According to figures from the American Farm Bureau Federation, a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, including turkey, stuffing, cranberries, pumpkin pie and all the basic trimmings will cost about 1.3 percent more this year when compared to 2009 food costs.
AFBF has conducted an informal price survey of the price of items typically found on the table during a Thanksgiving dinner. This is the organization’s 25th year to conduct the study.
The average cost to feed 10 is $43.47,  or $4.35 per-person, which is up about 56-cents from last year but down nearly $1 from 2008 prices.
The meal’s big-ticket items, turkey, actually decreased in price about $1 for a 16-pound turkey. Turkey is the biggest ticket items for most Thanksgiving meals.
“Turkey prices are down some this year despite the fact that, according to Agriculture Department estimates, turkey production has been slightly lower in 2010 than in 2009 and supplies of turkey in cold storage are below last year’s level,” said AFBF Economist John Anderson.
The downward trend in the price suggests, Anderson said, a push from retailers to get the birds off the shelves.
“This suggests that retailers are being fairly aggressive in featuring turkey in special sales and promotions.”
Other Thanksgiving staple items suck as whole milk and pumpkin pie mix are up in price over last year. Milk increased by 38-cents to $3.24 a gallon and pumpkin pie mix is up to @62 for a 30-ounce can, a 17-cent increase over 2009.
The changes in price largely reflect the health of the nation’s economy. Last year’s economic recession put downward pressure on food prices and the slight recovery in the economy is illustrated through rising food costs.
“Some of the Thanksgiving dinner items have rebounded from quite low price levels in 2009,” Anderson said. “For example, last year’s milk price was at its lowest level since 2001. Dairy product prices have climbed some in 2010, largely reflecting better consumer demand as the economy has gradually improved this year.”