Agvocating. It’s a term coined by the agriculture industry as part of its new push urging crop producers and cattlemen to tell family, friends, neighbors and strangers just what they do on their operations and why they do it.


Agvocating. It’s a term coined by the agriculture industry as part of its new push urging crop producers and cattlemen to tell family, friends, neighbors and strangers just what they do on their operations and why they do it.
“If you don’t tell your story,” said Debbie Lyons-Blythe, a Hope cattle rancher and mother of five. “Someone else will.”
Lyons-Blythe, one of the state’s largest and most successful agvocates spoke Tuesday during the McPherson Chamber of Commerce’s 26th annual Farm Forum.
The annual event is organization by the chamber’s agriculture committee, which is one of the most productive chamber agricutlure groups in the state.
Lyons-Blythe, guest speaker for the event, raises commercial Angus bulls, cows and heifers. She manages the daily operations of her family’s farm and documents her trials, tribulations and moments as a mother and care-taker on her blog, Kansas Cattle Ranch.
Through mediums such as Facebook, Twitter and blogging, Lyons-Blythe has seen how much incorrect information is available to consumers and how easily an outside organization can speak for agriculture.
“I’m not talking to you, because you all are already in agriculture,” Lyons-Blythe said. “I’m talking to the mother that is shopping for groceries or the husband and is going to fire up the grill.”
Outside organizations that aim to shut down animal agriculture have made their way into millions of households throughout the country.
Many consumers have heard their messages Lyons-Blythe said, and now it is up to agriculture to tell the other side of the story.
“Without us telling our story, that’s the only side they’re going to hear,” Lyons-Blythe.
Every producer doesn’t have to record videos for You Tube or blog about their time on the combine to make a different and an impression another person, they simply have to communicate their story and work to ensure the correct information is reaching consumers.
Only 2 percent of the U.S. population is directly or indirectly associated with agriculture today, that leaves the remaining 98 percent of America for producers and agriculture advocacy groups to connect and share their story with.
You can follow Lyons-Blythe on her blog Kansascattleranch.blogspot.com or find her on Facebook at Life on a Kansas Cattle Ranch.