The McPherson Board of Public Utilities released its annual water quality report this week. Water quality is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and all municipal utilities must adhere to a strick set of guidelines and rules for water contaniments and quality.


The McPherson Board of Public Utilities released its annual water quality report this week. Water quality is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and all municipal utilities must adhere to a strick set of guidelines and rules for water contaniments and quality.
The following are three things you should know about McPherson’s water quality:

BPU serves nearly 8,500 water customers, which includes four rural water districts. McPherson’s water is pumped from the Equus Beds, an underground water aquifer, and the only source of water for the utility.
The aquifer underlies portions of a four-county area, which is about 900,000 acres and generally flows from northwest to the southeast. Water is drawn from 12 underground wells located in and around McPherson.
Water from the wells are sent through BPU’s new blending facility located on W. Avenue A.

Everyone can help conserve water. Here are a few tips for conserving water around the home:
-Run the dishwasher and washing machine only when it’s full. Automatic dishwahers use 15 gallons for every cycles, regardless how many dishes are loaded.
-A typical shower, lasting about 8 minutes, will use 41 gallons if the shower is fitted with a 5 gallon-per-minute head. If the shower uses a new, 2.5 gallon-per-minute head, an 8 minute shower will use just 21 gallons.
-Check the faucets in your home. Just a slow drip can waste 15 to 20 gallosn a day. Fixing a leak can save almost 6,000 gallons a year.
-Use your water meter to detect a hidden leak. Turn off all aps and water-using appliances. Then check the meter afer 15 minutes. If it moved, you have a leak.

Several communities have made news after finding elevated levels of different substances in their drinking water. BPU is required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and State of Kansas to monitor the levels of certain contaminants. During the past three year, BPU has not detected elevated levels of any monitored substance. The chemical Atrazine, which has been news because of its link to the agriculture community, has only been detected in trace amounts in the drinking water. The most recent test, completed in 2008, shows the level of the chemical in the water measurers well below the maximum allowed levels. Lead was also found in only small levels in sampled drinking water. If you have questions about the quality of your drinking water, you can check out the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or log onto www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.