The forecast all but guarenteed rain Thursday.

Farmers were looking forward to the rain. With corn planting more than half-way done in the county, fields were due for some moisture to help the germination process along.


The forecast all but guarenteed rain Thursday.
Farmers were looking forward to the rain. With corn planting more than half-way done in the county, fields were due for some moisture to help the germination process along.
But Mother Nature never delivered. McPherson residents saw a trace of rain but not enough to help farmers.
Now they must wait.
McPherson County Agriculture Extension Agent Dale Ladd said in an ideal world, a field planted with corn would receive a quater to a half-inch of rain three or four days after the crop was planted. Ladd said it typically takes about one week for corn to germinate and during that time, a heavy rain could do more damage than good.
Because soil throughout the county contains clay, a hard, heavy rain would cause the soil to form a crust as it dries, making it difficult for the crop to emerge.
A steady to light rain is prefered.
As soon as the corn is in the ground, farmers will move onto soybeans and grain sorghum.
The state’s wheat crop is also beginning to suffer from a lack of moisture. According to the most recent crop progress and condition report published by the Kansas Agricultural Statistics service, a division of the United States Department of Agriculture, 75 percent of the state’s wheat crop is considered in fair, poor or very poor condition. Topsoil and subsoil in the central part of the state is still in fairly good condition. About 45 percent of the soil was rated as having adequate moisture levels.