The lack of moisture has not been kind to the state’s wheat crop but it has created suitable planting conditions for fall crops.


The lack of moisture has not been kind to the state’s wheat crop but it has created suitable planting conditions for fall crops.
According to the crop progress and condition report released Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas Field Office, corn planting reached 93 percent complete by Sunday, which is ahead of both the 2010 planting figures and the five-year planting averages.
Sixty-two percent of the crop has emerged and at this point, about 58 percent of the crop has been rated good or excellent. Only 3 percent has been declared in poor condition.
Soybean growers have also taken advantage of dry fields. Just shy of half of the state’s soybean crop is in the ground, well ahead of the 28 percent planted at this time last year and the five-year average of 34 percent planted.
Only 13 percent of the crop has emerged.
Sorghum is the last to go into the ground on many operations. Only 17 percent of the state’s grain sorghum has been planted, just is just ahead of last year’s planting figures but on par with the five-year average. Four percent of the crop has emerged.
Most of the state, including McPherson County, received rain last week. The area received about 1 inch of rain, which brings the 2011 precipitation total to 4.64 inches, 6.38 inches below average. McPherson had an average temperature of 61 degrees, which is 5 degree cooler than average temperatures for the third week of May.