Third-graders at Washington Elementary School posed as various explorers for their annual Living Wax Museum project Tuesday.


Third-graders at Washington Elementary School posed as various explorers for their annual Living Wax Museum project Tuesday.
Parents, teachers and other students from the school wandered throughout the gymnasium to hear presentations based on research the disguised boys and girls had done during the past month.
“They love it, they've been so excited since they walked in this morning,” said third-grade teacher Ranae Stites. “It’s just a fun way to share what they’ve learned.”
This is the first time the third-graders have been introduced to research learning in the classroom, which was the most difficult step of the process. Research was done at school, while all costumes were created at home.
The project also allows them to practice speaking in public, a common core standard for classroom. Each student read their explorer’s history at least 20 times at the event, after previously practicing in smaller groups.
Annah Zaharis, who played Jane Goodall, said she was nervous while presenting, but had no trouble with the research.
“My favorite part was figuring out what she did with chimpanzees and seeing how she worked with them.”
Zaharis said she chose Goodall because she worked with animals. Zaharis even had a few of her own stuffed chimpanzees as props by her table.
Elissa Nelson, who researched Sacagawea, said she learned many things.
“I didn't know who she helped, I just heard the name,” she said. “I think her life was interesting.”
Nelson added research was a challenge
“(Research) was hard because people don't know a lot about Sacagawea,” she said. “They don't even know when she was born.”
Chayse Stockham, who dressed as Christopher Columbus, chose the explorer because he was similar to a pirate and had maps.
“He was actually kind of cool,” Stockham said, adding he enjoyed the research. “He tried to find out about America.”