McPhersonSentinel - McPherson, KS
  • Controversial naturopath to talk supplements in McPherson

  • Controversial naturopath Joel Wallach claims most illnesses can be cured by supplementing your diet with colloidal (liquid) minerals and vitamins.

    • email print
  • Controversial naturopath Joel Wallach claims most illnesses can be cured by supplementing your diet with colloidal (liquid) minerals and vitamins.
    The once veterinarian who turned to natural medicine will sign books, including his “Dead Doctors Don’t Lie” from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday at The Bookshelf in McPherson and will speak at The Cedars at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    Wallach claims to have performed more than 20,000 autopsies on 454 animals during the 1970s. He studied cerebral palsy in primates and claimed to find the cause of the disease in those animals — work for which he was nominated for a Nobel Prize.
    His revelations led to his dismissal from his research position at which time Wallach decided to pursue study in naturopath medicine. Naturopath practitioners are recognized in 23 states, but are not the same as MD or DOs
    The lack of insurance in the veterinary field has resulted in veterinarians finding cures or prevention tools for hundreds of illnesses that still plague humans, Wallach said in a phone interview.
    Wallach began working with children of cystic fibrosis but later widened his scope to illnesses, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and high blood pressure.
    “Basically all vertebrates — hummingbirds or elephants — need 60 minerals, 16 vitamins and 12 amino acids,” he said.
    He calls his program “90 for Life.”
    He suggests supplementing human diets much like humans supplement animal diets.
    “We give a rabbits rabbit pellets of alfalfa. We don’t expect it to have all 90 essential nutrients in it. Alfalfa can vary from farm to farm. We give them supplements with the value added into it. We don’t depend on the food.”
    Wallach said veterinarians have been able to triple the life of dogs and done so without expensive medical care or organ transplants. Many birth defects are prevented in calves as a result of their mothers being given supplements before the calves are even conceived.
    Wallach has sued the Food and Drug Administration eight times, including one case on Folic Acid, which helped clear a path for foodmakers to add the supplement to foods, such as bread and pasta, to prevent neural tube defects.
    Wallach claims to be able to get people off their diabetes medicine and accuses standard practitioners of causing Alzheimer’s by the use of cholesterol lowering statin drugs.
    Wallach, however, is not without his detractors.
    “Colloidal mineral products have not been proven safe or effective. They are not better absorbed than regular mineral supplements,” Ellen Coleman, a registered dietitian and nutrition columnist, was quoted on the website The Skeptic's Dictionary.
    “James Pontolillo, a research scientist, is concerned that colloidal mineral products may contain toxic organic compounds,” the article continued. “The National Nutritional Food Association says that some colloidal mineral products ‘contain aluminum or toxic minerals; others are high in sodium. Some do not contain detectable amounts of minerals listed on their labels. Finally, there is no evidence that colloidal minerals are more bioavailable than those found in other forms.”
    Page 2 of 2 - The National Institutes of Health has posted warnings on its website about collodial silver.
    “Colloidal silver is not safe or effective for treating any disease or condition,” the site said. “Colloidal silver can cause serious side effects. The most common is argyria, a bluish-gray discoloration of the skin, which is usually not treatable or reversible.”
    The NIH suggested some supplements may be beneficial to health, but many supplements contain active ingredients that can have strong effects in the body. The NIH office of dietary supplements urged the public to be alert to the possibility of unexpected side effects.
    Wallach had answers for his detractors.
    “Those people are uniformed and have no education on nutrition,” he said of his opponents. “It is like teaching English to someone who speaks German when all you speak is Chinese. They have no history. Standard medical schools spend 14 to 15 minutes on nutrition, It is nothing they need to graduate. As a naturopath, I have chosen to prevent 900 different disease in patients.”
  • Comments are currently unavailable on this article

    Events Calendar