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McPhersonSentinel - McPherson, KS
  • 'Atlas', 'Grain Elevator' authors to sign books at Bookshelf

  • Lowell Flory will be at The Bookshelf from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday to sign copies of his father's “Historical Atlas of McPherson County.” This Raymond Flory publication has been updated with a 2012 reprint, hoping it will become a valued resource for a few more households on the rich history of McPherson County.
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  • “Historical Atlas of McPherson County” Lowell Flory will be at The Bookshelf from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday to sign copies of his father's “Historical Atlas of McPherson County.” This Raymond Flory publication has been updated with a 2012 reprint, hoping it will become a valued resource for a few more households on the rich history of McPherson County. Accented with a colorful new cover, new introduction, and updates to indexing, this 67 page book displays dozens of maps, graphs, and pages of explanatory text on such topics as native cultures, trails and roads, origins of settlers, homesteading families, and economic development. For 50 years a professor of history at McPherson College, Raymond Flory reflected a contagious enthusiasm for how an understanding of the past informs and enriches the present and shapes our future, a news release said. The “Historical Atlas of McPherson County” is one of many of his gestures to encourage a popular appreciation of that historical perspective. “American Grain Elevator” There will be a singing of “American Grain Elevator” from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday at The Bookshelf. The book explains the who, what, where and why of these sometimes massive structures that puzzle the traveler and are mostly taken for granted by the locals. The 111 page paperback, with more than 150 illustrations, tells the story of how grain storage began, elevators were invented, who owns them and how they work. The book includes sections on a variety materials used in the Midwest from the 1800s to today; with many historic photos and 86 full color examples of an important building form that is integral to our American heritage and agricultural economy. Author Linda Laird was born and raised in Wichita and received at B.A in anthropology and history from the University of Arizona. She became a historic preservation consultant and community planner, moving back to Hutchinson in 1989. In 1992, the Kansas Legislature revised the tax code to include taxing the historic wooden elevators used primarily for storage or remaining empty. Many of the oldest wood frame elevators have been torn down or burned since then to avoid taxes. Laird and her husband, Larry Haney, were determined to photographically document each elevator in Kansas before the destruction was complete.
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