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McPhersonSentinel - McPherson, KS
  • Ediger’s windbreak results in award 18 years later

  • To those who drive by Wes Ediger’s farm east of Inman, they may simply see a row of trees.
    For Ediger, that row represents many things, one of them being a recently-received Windbreak Conservation Award.
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  • To those who drive by Wes Ediger’s farm east of Inman, they may simply see a row of trees.
    For Ediger, that row represents many things, one of them being a recently-received Windbreak Conservation Award.
    The farmer planted about 75 cedar trees south of his home 18 years ago. They were obtained through the local K-State Research and Extension office, and planted in two rows, 30 feet apart.
    He was inspired to do so after the birth of his second daughter. After almost two decades of blocking the winds of gusty Kansas, the green giants now tower over both daughter and father.
    “It’s definitely a long-term investment,” he said. “The stickler is getting it done and staying on top of watering and weeding.”
    The project took him two days to complete, followed by a watering schedule once a week. Although the recent Kansas drought has posed a threat to many area trees, Ediger said his trees are established and he is not worried about their survival.
    The windbreak accompanies an earlier-planted row by his parents in the 1960s.
    “The wind always blows in Kansas, and it’s good to be able to get out of the wind,” he said. “It’s a lot more comfortable to be outside.”
    Ediger has not received a conservation award before but said it was nice to be recognized.
    “We all need to do our part,” he said. “Trees and plants convert carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses into oxygen. Windbreaks and trees are a great asset to our farm. They add beauty, character, privacy and calmness.”

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