In the March 2013 issue of Transfusion, an article has been published that chronicles the work of local area resident and McPherson High School graduate, Janet Monson.

In the March 2013 issue of Transfusion, an article has been published that chronicles the work of local area resident and McPherson High School graduate, Janet Monson.


As a requirement for completing the certification of a specialist in blood banking, Monson was required to conduct research and write a paper outlining that research. This project was completed in 2004 while she was working as a supervisor in the transfusion service/blood bank at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Houston.

Monson received a bachelor of science degree from Bethany College in Lindsborg and a bachelor of arts from Augustana College, Rock Island, Ill.

The goal of this research was to evaluate the combined effects of thawing FFP (fresh thawing FFP (fresh frozen plasma) at different temperatures and the prolonged storage of liquid plasma on the coagulation factors. Plasma transfusion is indicated in patients with documented coagulation factor deficiencies and active bleeding, or who are about to undergo an invasive procedure.

Thawed plasma not used by patients represents a loss in revenue as well as resource. Increased blood-related costs in health care continue to be a concern. One way to contain these costs is to maximize resource utilization. Although plasma clotting factor levels are reduced in 10 days of storage, the therapeutic levels of the coagulation factors were adequate. This is important because thawed plasma could be used over much longer than the 24-hour time period previously thought safe. Thawing of FFP at different temperatures did not affect the factor activity.

The head pathologist at St. Luke’s, Dr. Arthur Bracey, encouraged the publication of this paper. Through the work of a resident, Dr. Ashok Tholpady, who expanded the paper’s discussion and the researcher’s input in clarification of the testing process, the paper has been published in the March 2013 issue of Transfusion (Transfusion” 2013; 53:645-650).  

Transfusion is AABB’s scholarly, peer-reviewed monthly journal, publishing the latest technological advances, clinical research and controversial issues related to transfusion medicine, cellular and gene therapies, and tissue transplantation. Publication in this journal is the equivalent for transfusion service/blood bank to publication in the prestigious and more widely known New England Journal of Medicine.

A goal of many in scientific disciplines is to have one’s research published. Monson said she feels especially thrilled  the article has been printed in Transfusion.