A change in computer technology at the library could save the city more than $100,000 in the first year and make the system more reliable.

A change in computer technology at the library could save the city more than $100,000 in the first year and make the system more reliable.


Currently, the public library has 28 thin client computers.

A thin client computer is a system with no hard drive of it’s own, just RAM. Consequently, these thin client computers all rely on the same server to perform basic functions.

If that server has problems, however, each of these thin client computers are rendered useless.

“It’s too fragile,” Steve Read, library director, said. “When you have problems with the server, everything crashes.”

Read announced his plan to shut down the library’s thin client server this fall and switch to a newer technology that utilizes cloud computing.

Cloud computing consists of utilizing a web-based service to access needed programs. The heavy lifting, in this case, is run by computers that make up the cloud, rather than on a local machine.

Mayor Tom Brown said the change would save the city more than $100,000 during the year.

“It’ll be inexpensive compared to what it has been,” he said.

Library reports state records in circulation

Read showed evidence of growth within the library to commissioners on Monday.

Read said the McPherson Public Library currently has the highest circulation capita in it’s class in the state of Kansas.

Read said the library saw it’s second highest city circulation per capita in it’s history during the 2012 year. The highest was the opening year of the building.

Read said an average of 12,600 people pass through the library’s doors each month, and that reserve requests have increased by one-third since last year.

Currently, he said the library staff has more than 200 years of combined library experience.

Brown said the budget can be adjusted as necessary depending on anticipated cuts.