|
|
|
McPhersonSentinel - McPherson, KS
  • McPherson students take charge of their own learning

  • When school gets out at McPherson elementary schools, some students' destination is imagination, not home.
    • email print
      Comment
  • When school gets out at McPherson elementary schools, some students' destination is imagination, not home.
    Students participating in the Destination Imagination program work in small groups to complete tasks, such as building towers out of paper. While they are supervised by teachers, they are responsible for coming up with all the solutions and strategies.
    “It's a program for kids to experience creative learning and apply their imaginations to various activities,” said Kelsey Otto, who supervises a group of third-grade students.
    Destination Imagination is a national, annual program that runs from October to April. Kids complete various challenges that test their creativity, teamwork and communication skills. They also compete with other teams with a final project in April.
    Though they've only been at it a few weeks, Otto said she can already see some results.
    “What I can see instantly is they're learning to work with kids that aren't in their circle of friends,” Otto said. “It helps them learn to build teams and connect with each other and their teachers.”
    Deb Hulse, who supervises a team of fifth-graders, said the program helps students learn skills valuable to their future as students and professionals.
    “To make it in the world, they'll have to be problem solvers and cooperative,” Hulse said.
    Teacher supervisors are only allowed to get materials the students ask for and read instructions. All solutions have to come from the students themselves, forcing them to rely on each other rather than adults.
    Blade Anderson, a fifth-grade student, said he likes that format.
    “You don't get called on. It's just your group,” Anderson said. “It helps us learn more. You have to make your own answers.”
    Tucker Pelnar, a third-grade student, said he enjoyed that students were in control when his team built a paper tower.
    “We got to create it and the teachers couldn't tell us what to do,” Pelnar said. “You can pretty much do anything.”

        calendar