Hearing the word “run” can bring about bad images for some people. The word alone can conjure up thoughts of pain and negative emotions. I am here to tell you if you start out slow, even those of us that never thought of ourselves as a runner can become one.

Hearing the word “run” can bring about bad images for some people.  The word alone can conjure up thoughts of pain and negative emotions.  I am here to tell you if you start out slow, even those of us that never thought of ourselves as a runner can become one.  
I myself never thought of myself as a “runner,” but after seeing a sign up for a 5k I decided to give it a try.  I searched the internet and found many, many, many options for a couch to 5k type running plan.  
I found the one that looked like I could manage and tried it out.  I am happy to report after just six weeks of training I was able to run that entire 5k.
 So what are the steps to becoming a runner? First things first, good running shoes.  This is really the only expense to running.  Making sure that your shoes are made to run in and fit your feet correctly is the first step to a comfortable run.  
There are specialty running stores that you can go to, and they will fit your feet to the right shoe, or you can go to a department store and pick up running shoes, not walking or cross trainers.  
Your shoes should last about 3-6 months, depending on how much you run and where you run. It’s time for new shoes when you can feel that there is no more padding and the treads have worn off the bottom.
Now to get started, start with a program that does not leave you completely out of breath and not wanting to ever run again.  Make sure you start slow and work your way up.  Go for a 20 minute “run”—run for a couple of minutes then walk for a couple of minutes build up until you can run the entire 20 minutes then start adding time in and take walking breaks as needed.  
As a beginner, don’t focus on the miles run, focus on the minutes run and as you get stronger you will run farther and faster and the miles will come.  
This leads me to the next point in getting started.  Running is a great cardio-respiratory workout, but in order to build strength you will need to add in strength training a couple days a week on non-consecutive days.  Adding strength training will help you to achieve your running and, if you are wanting, weight-loss goals faster.
 How often you run will depend on your schedule and how quickly you want to achieve a specific goal.  Like most exercises, putting running into your daily schedule will help you to stick to your goal.  
I find that for myself having a race to run at the end of my journey helps.  Find a race at a doable distance and in a doable amount of time and sign up for it so that you have an end goal.  Depending on your fitness level, to run a 5K give yourself at least 6 weeks to work up to that distance.
So give running a try and see what new sights you can see and what new goals you can accomplish.