The second of two movies created and set in Kansas for viewing this month at the McPherson Opera House will be shown at 7 p.m. Thursday.

The second of two movies created and set in Kansas for viewing this month at the McPherson Opera House will be shown at 7 p.m. Thursday.
“We had a great turnout to ‘Road to Valhalla.’ It was an excellent film,” said John Holecek, Opera House director. “The reviews for ‘Wichita’ are coming in and are terrific. It’s been rated 9.7 on IMDb, which is higher than Star Wars! It was very well received in Wichita, where the premiere sold out at the Orpheum.”
Actors, writers, directors and producers will be present for a meet and greet and question-answer session after the film is shown. Tickets are $6 at the door.
Set in 1882, “Wichita” is the tale of a mysterious fugitive who seeks out his revenge on the person who caused his imprisonment. His tracking skills lead him to the quiet town of Wichita, where there’s more happening than meets the eye. A stranger and a bounty hunter also converge upon the town, and all have an effect on each other. There is suspense but also some humor.
The film follows the typical Spaghetti Western arc: A stranger in town befriends the locals and a mystery is uncovered and finally solved.
Nick Barton, Prestigious Films, the movie’s writer and director, admits the film is not for children. It’s “dark and gritty; there’s violence; but it’s also a psychologically intense piece.”
“It’s an honest portrayal of family life in Wichita at the time,” Barton said. He thinks it’s a more realistic look at life in the era than many Westerns.
Set in Wichita, the film was shot in Cowtown and in the Flint Hills, “still a completely raw landscape,” Barton said.
Barton said he didn’t start out intending to produce a Western.
“We have to be honest about what’s affordable to produce [in Kansas,]“ he said, adding that “a metropolitan story like you would shoot on the east or west coast isn’t financially possible here. But using what’s available provides us the opportunity to produce the film in the style of a big budget movie. At least we think so. People will need to come and see if we got it right.”