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McPhersonSentinel - McPherson, KS
  • Home Help: Small changes that fool the eye

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  • Tip of the Week
    Perform some magic in your own home with these tips to fool the eyes and transform small, drab spaces into ones that will astound and amaze.
    * When used properly, certain paint colors can make a room look larger. Very light colors or whites, for example, can help reflect natural or artificial light, making the walls seem to disappear and creating a space that looks bigger. Picking the perfect neutral can give the illusion that your walls are receding.
    * Embrace the dark side, too. Using a dark color on everything — moldings, cabinets and walls — gives a unified, seamless look makes the room appear larger. A semi-gloss finish that helps light bounce off the shiny surface is helpful.
    * Another way to keep costs and clutter down is by making trim and other decor items vanish. Instead of over-furnishing, accessorize with multi-purpose pieces like a decorative storage chest that can double as a coffee table or a set of nesting tables that can be easily stored when not in use.
    — Brandpoint
    Home-Selling Tip
    Spruce up your entryway: Cleaning or swapping doormats for new ones is a subtle way to boost curb appeal and bring a sense of freshness and order to your home.
    — Brandpoint
    Did You Know
    Breathe easier
    Houseplants not only add a splash of color and style to rooms, but they also filter and purify the air, removing a number of toxins and irritants from the close-by environment.
    Decorating Tip
    Open up
    Furniture with open arms and exposed legs help keep your eyes flowing through the room, giving an illusion of depth and space. Glass tables and mirrors help with the effect.
    — Brandpoint
    Garden Guide
    Fall greens
    In the northern half of the country, now is the time to begin planting leafy greens for fall harvest. Lettuce, broccoli, kale, arugula and cabbage can all be put in the ground, as well as some root vegetables like radishes. Gardeners in hot-weather areas, like the Southern states, will likely want to wait another two or three weeks.
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