With the New Year looming right around the corner, many find themselves thinking about what they want to accomplish this coming year. As you change your calendar from December to January, there’s always a bit of a thrill in the promise of a new year that’s full of potential. The New Year a is chance to start fresh and say goodbye to any of the frustrations the previous year held—a perfect opportunity to make resolutions that will help strengthen one’s spirit, mind and body.

However, many of us find our resolutions thrown out along with the holiday decorations. It’s no wonder—starting the New Year by making sweeping cuts to our diets and declarations that we’ll hit the gym seven days a week doesn’t exactly set us up for success! But by reframing resolutions and breaking them down into smaller, easy-to-sustain goals, you’ll see big benefits in the long run.

As a community-serving organization here in McPherson, we see how things such as getting involved in with the community and making lifestyle changes can change someone’s life for the better. Here are five New Year’s Resolutions the McPherson Family YMCA recommends for 2018:

1. Move More: It’s important for children to get at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day (30 minutes for adults). Incorporate physical activity into your daily routines and spend more time walking to places instead of driving to improve your health and well-being.

2. Swap a Soda a Day: It may be difficult, but cutting soda can do wonders for your body. If you can’t cut it entirely, resolve to swap one soda a day for a large glass of water instead. Once you’ve been able to swap one out, see if you can cut soda entirely.

3. Schedule Family-Time: With work, school and activities, family-time may seem like an impossible ask, but see if your family can have a “screen-free” night with no phones, video games, etc. Instead, use that time to play a board game, play outside or visit with family and friends.

4. Volunteer Your Time: Giving back and supporting neighbors can benefit everyone involved. Not only is it a personally rewarding experience to help others in need, but it’s also a way to meet new people or discover an interest. Find an opportunity in your community, such as reading to children at the library or distributing food at a local food bank.

5. Put Extras to Good Use: Do you have extra canned goods or clothes that could benefit others in need? Clean out your pantry, closet or attic and donate extra items to homeless shelters or community outreach programs.

Tyler Glidden is the wellness director for the McPherson Family YMCA.