While gearing up for a car show at Old Empire Days this weekend, some of Galva's residents are taking their love of all things vehicular a step further and are creating a museum to showcase cars, motorcycles and tractors.

While gearing up for a car show at Old Empire Days this weekend, some of Galva's residents are taking their love of all things vehicular a step further and are creating a museum to showcase cars, motorcycles and tractors.

The museum has yet to be named, but will be housed in what was once the Galva Lumber Company at 108 W. Second St. in Galva. Don Sullivan, Doug Ward and Junior Russell are spearheading the effort to renovate the building and bring together vehicles, models, magazines, parts books and automobile-related advertising pieces to furnish the museum.

"We gutted this whole place," Russell said. "It's a pretty neat place. We just started putting stuff in here a month ago."

Through the building's large front windows, passersby can already see Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Cushman motor scooters, a Ford Model A and a 1930 Chrysler. Behind those vehicles sit an antique Chevrolet Chevelle and a Pontiac Firebird. Then, there is Russell's pride and joy, a black 2005 John Deere Gator.

"It's never been in the mud and it's never been put in 4-wheel drive," Russell said.

While there is still a long list of projects to complete before they open to the public, Russell said the site is ideal because of the abundance of storage areas and spaces to display cars.

The plan is for items gathered for the museum to come from Galva residents, Russell said, including a unique collection of antique model and toy trucks designated for one section of the museum.

"It's all tricked out. He's got one that has 72 lights on it where they ought to be on the truck. He's got some cool stuff," Russell said. "We've got a bunch of old Harley stuff and old motorcycle stuff."

Russell attributes most the fascination with antique cars to people's nostalgia for the era in which they grew up, but noted that younger people are starting to become interested in collecting and restoring older vehicles as well.

As if to prove his point, a pair of young ladies who wandered by were waved inside by Russell, and they were excited at the chance to get a closer look at the vehicles.

"These cars in here are cool," one young lady proclaimed.

Russell said the citizens of Galva are already protective of the collection and the building is monitored by himself, the Galva police and residents who are quick to note if anything seems out of place.

"Galva's a pretty close-knit town," Russell said. "If someone's got something they're working on, the guys will be over there. You just automatically chip in."

That community spirit was evidenced by the support he received when he recently fought cancer, Russell said.

"I had people help me that I didn't even know cared. Now that I'm feeling good, I'm trying to pay back Galva," Russell said. "That's just the way Galva is. If it happens to one, it happens to all of us. You just pitch in. If you get ten guys working, you can do anything, it don't take no time at all. We look out for each other."