After Tuesday’s election, two candidates for the Lansing City Council appeared to have won by razor-thin margins. And these two races still could tighten even more, the county clerk said.

After Tuesday’s election, two candidates for the Lansing City Council appeared to have won by razor-thin margins. And these two races still could tighten even more, the county clerk said.

“I think it’s going to get closer,” County Clerk Janet Klasinski said.

The unofficial results released Tuesday evening show challenger Marcus Majure defeating incumbent Andi Pawlowski by a margin of seven votes in a race for Ward 2 of the Lansing City Council.

Unofficial results also showed incumbent Jesse Garvey defeating challenger Betty Klinedinst by a margin of six votes in a Ward 3 race.

Since votes were counted Tuesday, the County Clerk’s Office has received additional advance ballots for those two races. Klasinski said her office can continue to accept advance ballots as long as they were postmarked by no later than Tuesday and arrive in the mail by Friday.

There also may be provisional ballots that could impact these races.

Klasinski said it is possible the outcomes could change as additional votes are counted.

“I think that’s a real possibility,” she said.

Election results will be certified Nov. 12 when county commissioners meet as the Board of County Canvassers.

Overall voter turnout in the county was 15.5%, Klasinski said.

The county saw the highest turnout in Ward 2 in Lansing. The turnout there was 30.48%.

There were several contested races Tuesday in Leavenworth County.

In one of the races, challenger Gary Johnson unseated incumbent Jeanette Klamm for a position on the Basehor-Linwood Board of Education.

Most members of the Basehor-Linwood school board represent districts within the school system.

Johnson was elected to the board’s Position No. 3, which represents a southern section of the school district.

Johnson defeated Klamm and challenger B. Lorance.

Johnson received 398 votes. Klamm received 369 votes, and Lorance received 94 votes, according to the unofficial results.

David Frese was elected the new mayor of Tonganoxie. He defeated Tonganoxie City Council member Rocky Himpel and challenger Sherry Agee.

Frese received 376 votes. Himpel received 234 votes and Agee received 97 votes, according to the unofficial results.

In the race for Tonganoxie City Council, incumbent Lisa Patterson and newcomer Jake Dale won.

They were elected as the top two vote-getters in a field of four candidates.

Patterson received 454 votes and Dale received 334 votes.

Among the remaining candidates, incumbent Curtis Oroke received 197 votes and challenger Zachary Stoltenberg received 188 votes, according to unofficial results.

In a race for Position 2 of the Tonganoxie Board of Education, incumbent Kaija Baldock defeated challenger Connie O’Brien. The vote was 707 to 504, according to unofficial results.

Some races were decided Tuesday by write-in votes.

Phillip Mires appears to have been elected the new mayor of Easton based on write-in votes, Klasinski said.

Former Mayor Bobby O. Watkins was the only person who filed as a candidate for the position of Easton mayor. But he resigned as mayor due to health reasons ahead of the election, and he later passed away.

Several seats on the Easton City Council also were decided Tuesday by write-in votes.

Russ Gildner was the only person who filed as a candidate for the Easton City Council. But there were a total of five seats up for election, so four people were elected through write-in votes.

In addition to Gildner, it appears Shannon Hadley, Tami Connel, Nathaniel Jackson and Jeremy Lorenzo have been elected to the Easton City Council, Klasinski said.

The race for Linwood mayor also was decided by write-in votes because no one filed for the position.

Klasinski said it appears current Mayor Brian Christenson won re-election through write-in votes.

An amendment to the Kansas Constitution also was on the ballot Tuesday.

A majority of Leavenworth County voters approved the amendment 4,191 to 2,456.

And the amendment was approved by voters across the state. The statewide vote count was 198,180 “yes” votes and 134,348 “no” votes, according to unofficial results from the Kansas Secretary of State’s Office.

The amendment will end the state government’s practice of adjusting census numbers for military personnel and college students when it comes to drawing districts for the Kansas Senate and Kansas House of Representatives.

Twitter: @LVTNewsJohnR